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GOP Policy: Keeping ’em Barefoot and Pregnant

by Invenium Viam on October 13, 2015 · 1 comment

Traditionalism: The Foundation of GOP's War on Women

Traditionalism: The Foundation of the GOP’s War on Women

“The only way to keep a woman happy is to keep her barefoot and pregnant.” Arthur E. Hertzler, the ‘Horse-and-Buggy Doctor’


The principles of American Conservatism have been defined as respect for American traditions, choosing republicanism over federalism, upholding Judeo-Christian values and the rule of law, defense of Western culture from perceived threats of multi-culturalism, moral relativism, and the devaluing or deterioration of traditional culture; reliance on capitalism as the most efficient and equitable economic system vs. socialism or communism; and advocacy of American exceptionalism in foreign relations.


A good many conservatives think that whatever they believe, liberals will choose to believe just the opposite. Just to be contrarian. What else would explain liberals’ consistent failure to acknowledge common sense? What they don’t seem to realize is that while their system of political thought and action is based on valuing the static and monolithic, the system of thought and action among liberals is based on managing the dynamic and polymorphic. They focus on maintaining the status quo. We focus on managing a changing status quo. That’s where the fundamental difference lies. It’s a difference they detest.


Conservatives love to talk about the past as examples of what America was, and could be again, if only the country would cleave to conservative principles (as outlined above) the way a biblical husband should cleave to his biblical wife. One of their favorite examples is the Eisenhower Era — for them, a time of peace and prosperity when America held it’s rightful place as both the leader/defender of the free world and the economic engine of western civilization. Conservative leaders look back wistfully on that Utopia of Yesteryear and blame godless, socialist liberals for advancing anti-American policies that are undermining our traditional strengths and hastening the country’s moral, spiritual and economic decline. Take for example Rep. Michelle Bachman’s statement on Hardball several years ago, calling for a return to McCarthyism, that had Chris Matthews shaking his head in disbelief: “I wish the American media would take a great look at the views of the people in Congress and find out: Are they pro-America or anti-America?”


Do It Like IkeConservatives yearn for a yesterday that never was. They look to the past through the distorting lenses of a false nostalgia, a counterfeit history, and cite it as an example of a Lost Camelot we need to find again. They fail to look with objective eyes at the whole of an era and judge it on all its merits and deficiencies. To do so would require polymorphic thinking. Instead, they look to TheDonald® for his promise to return the country to those halcyon days of yore, his promise to “make America great again.”


And they believe with all their hearts; oh my yes, they believe. Brothers and Sisters, can I get a witness?


Their related belief that liberals … anti-American liberals … socialist, non-Christian, baby-killing liberals … stand in the way of a return to the Utopian America of Neverwas is what justifies the conservative’s continuing intransigence on legislation, their continuing insistence on budget-cutting, their continuing threats to shut down the government, their astonishing treason in attempting to undercut President Obama’s nuclear disarmament initiative with Iran, and their willingness to use the power of government and taxpayer’s money to attempt to discredit a Democratic candidate for the presidency. All’s fair in love and war; they consider politics a form of war by other means.


This belief system is also what justifies their continuing War On Women. GOP policies towards American women can be easily encapsulated: Keep ’em Barefoot and Pregnant. The evidence is quite clear: 1) Refusal to enact legislation ensuring equal pay for equal work; 2) Refusal to support women’s reproductive and other gender-specific health needs; 3) Refusal to support policies that help women in the workplace such as extended maternity and post-partum leave, affordable child care, sick child leave, etc. 4) Continuing attacks on women’s health providers including both private clinics and Planned Parenthood; 5) Undermining social safety nets that benefit poor and elderly women including Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. 6) Blocking women’s access to the polls, along with other demographic groups that vote majority Democrat. 7) Blocking passage of the Equal Rights Amendment.


But, once again, what conservatives choose to believe about the gilded past is simply wrong. Here are some elements of the Republican platform in 1956: 1956 GOP Platform


So just for kicks, kids, let’s take a walk down the primrose path to Wayback When and — just for a moment — we’ll sojourn there for a moment to re-live the vaunted years of the Eisenhower Era. We’ll enjoy reading about “traditional” attitudes among Americans with regard to the “traditional” roles of men and women in marriage and in society as exemplified in the pages of newspapers across the country including the Eugene Register-Guard and the Sarasota Journal as published on May 21, 1958 …


click here to continue

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the dread “BLOOD MOON”
courtesy, Getty Images

Yup. There it is. The big bad scary “Blood Moon”. I walked out and took a look at it this evening (Sunday), and at the lunar eclipse. There were even a few bats flying around — whoooo, scary! (NOT)


Now I can check that off the back page of my bucket list, if my bucket list was as long as War and Peace, which it is not. It was a passing minor novelty, an event of interest so long as I had nothing more pressing or interesting to do. (If you are pressed for time, I would encourage skipping the serious stuff, and head down to the fun videos at the end of the post.)


Too be fair, one of these blood moon eclipses came through in 1982; I also got a good look at Halley’s comet when it came through in 1984, and Hale-Bopp in 1997 as well, out in a rural area relatively clear of light pollution, and that was interesting, but not something to produce an adrenaline rush.  Even with exceedingly modest visual enhancement, it was not exciting, although I admit that having had access to a serious telescope for astronomy classes spoils one for some forms of naked-eye celestial observation.


There has been a lot of silly anti-science-based hype about the blood moon, the ‘super’ moon, and the eclipse.  It is prevalent in the crazy fringe religious righties who have hijacked the GOP via the Tea Party.  It appeals to the “end days is comin’!” anti-science ignorati, those who constitute the base for the likes of Michele Bachmann, Rick Santorum, Rick Perry, Ben Carson or Mike Huckster-bee. They are defined by superstition passing as religion.


They thrive on scaring the crap out of people, mostly by making up things which have no significant or substantive foundation in objective reality.  In other words, they thrive on right wing propaganda.


It’s time we stop letting the superstitious and ignorant anywhere near authority above the level of making the potato salad for small gatherings. When fact differs from faith, faith is wrong, and fact and reason should supersede stupid or fantasy based, no matter how often or loudly someone is tossing around the word Jesus. If you read that last sentence as dripping with scorn, you would be correct.

From the Inquisitr:


Astrophysicist Neil DeGrasse Tyson: Super Moon won’t be that super

There’s a lot of excitement about the “super blood moon” on Sunday night — a total lunar eclipse that will give the moon a reddish appearance. The excitement centers on a few different ideas. One is the notion expressed by some religious groups that a blood moon is tied to Biblical prophecy. More widespread is simply the anticipation of seeing a really amazing celestial sight.

Unfortunately, those who are hoping for a spectacular once-in-a-lifetime view may find themselves disappointed.

What’s more special about this moon than the appearance is timing, or rather, the frequency with which the type of lunar eclipses we refer to as a blood moon are currently occurring. Specifically, when four blood moons occur at approximately six-month intervals. According to NASA, while lunar eclipses of one type or another occur about twice a year, a tetrad of blood moons is much rarer. There will be a total of eight this century.

Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist and science promoter, discussed the blood moon on Twitter today, explaining that while it will appear larger than usual, it won’t be much larger, and that the color won’t be as deep and bloody red as many may expect from the name. [tweet below]

11h11 hours ago

Resist the Hype: The size of today’s “Super” moon is to next month’s full moon as a 16.07 inch pizza is to a 16.00 inch pizza

For some believers, the event is even more special, as they connect it to biblical prophecy. The Red Moon Rapture website lays out some of these prophecies, and how one group of believers feels that they connect to current events. Specifically, all four of the blood moon events in this tetrad fall on or quite near important events in the Jewish calendar, and the group believes it could be a sign that the Rapture is imminent. As with most rapture predictions, though, this largely comes from a few outlying groups, not from any mainstream belief systems.



Artist's conception. Not actually  a Republican primary voter

Artist’s conception. Not actually a Republican primary voter

So this is a bit scary. From a poll of likely Republican primary voters, and consider these are the people picking a major party candidate:


q23 Do you think that the Government is trying to
take over Texas or not?
The Government is trying to take over Texas 32%
The Government is not trying to take over Texas 40%
Not sure 28%

How nice that a plurality could recognize stupidity. However, add the believers and the undecided, and 60% of Republicans believe it’s somewhere between plausible and true that Jade Helm 15 is a cover for martial law or locking up the “patriots” in empty Walmarts. The only patriots locked up in Walmart are the workers locked in when their shifts are over but their managers want some free labor.

The PPP poll asked about presidential candidates and the results will affect #ThisGuyWantsToBePresident, but first, a slight tangent related to Jade Helm 15. A different poll had an unexpected result:

The Rasmussen survey found that particular concern was partisan: 50 percent of conservatives believed military training exercises would lead to greater federal control of some states. By contrast, 67 percent of liberals and 58 percent of those who identified as moderates said they weren’t concerned, according to the survey.

That’s right, you’re not seeing things. Liberals trust the armed forces more than conservatives do. This is foolish when there were troops in the streets of Minneapolis just today. I saw them! Are they seizing my guns? Are they planning to lock us up? Are they … having lunch in the same restaurant I am … oh. Right, Fort Snelling is close by. Never mind.
OK, enough laughing at the loonies and back to how the PPP poll affects #ThisGuyWantsToBePresident. The beginning idea is that by the time we know who the Republican candidate will be, the foibles of early 2015 will have gone down the memory hole no matter how relevant. So the hashtag can be searched on Twitter (and maybe Facebook to some degree) and the hashtag or the title can be searched here. Since the candidate could be anyone being talked about in national media, the idea was to just track them all. That seemed more plausible when there were fewer of them, but Rachel Maddow the other night counted 20 that are either officially running, unofficially running, or making “look at me!” noises and are too plausible as candidates to be blown off. I won’t speak for anyone else, but I give in. I can’t follow that many. Time to cull the sprouts, much earlier than planned, but I still don’t want to rely on my own sense that “no way this guy is going to win”. I want some data, and that linked PPP poll is rich in it.


I predict that there will be no ‘fix’ changing this law; the only adequate ‘fix’ is repeal.


No Republican candidate, many of whom are embracing the Pence legislation, will ever be elected.


Denver station 7 hits PRECISELY on why this legislation differs from either the federal legislation that Pence keeps referring to, and differs substantially from the other 19 states with the legislation he refers to as well.  This has ALWAYS been about LGBT discrimination.


First of all, the claim that this was not intended to be discriminatory is not credible.

From abc 7:

Indiana ‘religious freedom’ law is different – and here’s why
Hobby Lobby paved the way, not Clinton-era law

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The backlash to Indiana’s new Religious Freedom Restoration law is growing but the bill’s opponents are blaming the wrong Hoosier. Indiana-born Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts’ role is far more important than Governor Mike Pence’s, even though Pence signed the law.
Here’s why:
You probably have heard that 19 states besides Indiana already have “a” Religious Freedom Restoration law and that all those laws “are based” on the federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) passed by Congress and signed by President Bill Clinton in 1993. That is true only loosely, only if the words above are in quotes.
Indiana’s RFRA law has new and different language than the other statutes and the federal law. And it has different legislative intent.
States began passing their own RFRA laws only after 1997, when the Supreme Court ruled that the 1993 federal law did not govern state laws.  States wanted to “protect” religious liberty just as the feds had (more on that later).
But all of that came before Chief Justice Roberts ruled last summer in Hobby Lobby v. Burwell.  That was the famous case that ruled that a business, Hobby Lobby, was being burdened in its free expression of religion by a provision of the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare to its foes) requiring coverage for contraception. This was a revolution in defining religious freedom in this country.
The Indiana law is the first state RFRA to pass after Hobby Lobby, and it actually codifies its jurisprudence in two ways.
First, it explicitly states that for-profit businesses – and not just individuals – have a right to the free exercise of religion. As The Atlantic points out, the federal law has no such language, nor do 17 of the 19 existing state RFRA statues. In fact, Louisiana and Pennsylvania exclude businesses from being protected by RFRA.
Second, the Indiana law makes explicit that for-profit business’ free exercise of religion is a defense against discrimination claims made not just by the government but also by private parties, something that is murky in the federal law.
So the claim that Indiana’s new law is just the same as a bunch of existing laws is off base.
That claim is also disingenuous and phony in a much simpler way, and so is the claim that that RFRA laws are not being used to try to justify discrimination.



Dear Mike Pence,

You sir, Governor Pence, are a liar and a coward, and a bigot. But mostly you are a liar.


Do not pretend, Pence, conservatives, that your legislation is LIKE the federal legislation.  It is not.  Federal legislation supported religious freedom for individuals when infringed by government.  This treats businesses as people — hello, anti-LGBT Romney — and it facilitates businesses discriminating in public accommodation against individuals over sexual orientation.  It is not about freedom, it is just about facilitating dumb bigotry.


Let’s just cut to the chase, cut through your bulls*it.  Your statement on the George Stephanopolous Sunday ‘talking head’ interview was dishonest, and it was nothing more than a clumsy tap dance trying to get around the truth.


It is significant that Pence is trying to tar both Bill Clinton (as a proxy for Hillary Clinton, and Barack Obama, both of whom support LGBT rights) in advance of a potential presidential run.


ABSOLUTELY, “Hoosiers engage in discrimination.” (see the video of the interview at the 10 minute mark); they not only engage in LGBT discrimination, they want it, YOU WANT IT, and they brag about doing it.  Do just give it up on having it both ways; you know this law you signed is entirely about religious anti-LGBT discrimination being given proactive and preemptive legal cover to let them do so where previously they did not have such legal advantage for discrimination.


The AFA was right there with you when you signed this; they pushed for it, they’re candid about what it is: a pro-discrimination bill to legalize anti-LGBT discrimination. PERIOD.


So quit lying about it; you’re not any of you going to get away with having it both ways, a discrimination law AND not a pro-discrimination law.  You might as well pander to the bigots, Mikey; because you aren’t fooling the rest of us.


From Mediaite:

The man, who only identified himself as Ryan, said that as a Christian he understands that some people have a different “lifestyle” than him, but he doesn’t want them coming into his place of business and making his customers “uncomfortable.”

The hosts did not let him off easy, asking directly if he has ever discriminated against gay people in his restaurant. “I have discriminated,” he said openly, explaining that he has pretended there was a problem with his kitchen in order to not serve them in the past.

“That makes you feel OK?” Rachel Bogle asked him. “I mean, when you get a bed at night saying, ‘I’ve discriminated against other human beings,’ you feel at ease with that?”

Ryan said he feels fine about it because he believes he should be able to do whatever he wants in his own restaurant. “We don’t want to have this in our place of business, it’s just not right,” he said. But while the caller was happy to share his story, he would not say the name of his restaurant.

Let me sort this out for you and for your bigot businessman restaurant owner. ‘Ryan’ wants to be able to tell people they can’t eat at his place of business, but he doesn’t want to risk losing the heterosexual $$$ of people who would not knowingly patronize the businesses that discriminate.


Let me point out Ryan, let me point out Governor Pence, that LGBT people pay taxes. Those taxes pay for the infrastructure and services that make it possible for this business owner to make money, to operate his business. Our armed forces have gay patriots serving in their ranks protecting this country, so that those businesses may operate, so that state, and all the other states and territories are safe and free.


So unless these businesses want to go somewhere else, outside this country, they have no damned right, no damned freedom to take all the benefits of taxation which includes the LGBT community along with the family and friends who support them being who they are as human beings who were born the way they are. There is no more right to do that, no more ethical or moral justification, no political justification to do that, than there ever was to deny service to a person of color, or a person who is of an ethnicity like being Jewish or Asian, or to deny someone service on the basis of a religion in which they were raised or chose to embrace.


This notion that there is some kind of religious legitimacy to discriminate is one we’ve seen before, used to try to prop up segregation of races. It was wrong then, and it is wrong now. That belief creates a second class group of citizens, and then tries to smear heaps of lipstick on that pig to pretend it is nothing else.


There will be a severe penalty for you Governor Pence, much larger than I believe you have calculated. Not the least of those penalties, those costs will be to the people in your state who support this law and who elected you. Personally however Governor, you can kiss good bye any hope or dream you might ever have, in 2016 or any other time in the future, to sit in the office of President in our White House.

Bigots are going bye bye. And you gentlemen — all of you who contemplate and desire to enact laws like this, you damned conservative bigots, are as conservatives always are, on the wrong side of the arc of history. You consistently choose the role of the bad guy, and then you whine about it after you made the choice of your own will. Your values are flawed, your morality and ethics are dirty and ugly. YOU FAIL.

It is only a matter of when, not if, your law will be flushed down the toilet of s*itty historic legislation, where it will end up on the dung heap of human hatred.


GIGO = Garbage In, Garbage Out, or my alternative version, Garbage Information, Garbage Opinion.


Do you remember any of the many examples of the radical right believing not in a true spiritual faith, but in foolish superstition, of the kind which denies real cause and effect, and replaces it with made up silly stuff? Here are a few, a little fun for those who are still superstitious about on Friday the 13th. Laugh at the superstition, and have a good laugh at the right wing nuts too.


This is one of my favorites, expressing the notion apparently that all that hard work, death and sacrifice, expense and effort to win the Civil War was unnecessary. Because the ridiculous religious right and the radical right generally believe God picks favorites; they believe HE doesn’t love all his children, at least not equally. And until Lincoln made his prayer, depending on your interpretation of God’s motives and reasoning, God was just flipping a coin as to which side of the Civil War to prefer, until Lincoln lobbied Him or bribed Him with better prayers than the other side.


I don’t know about you, but I find that offensive as a religious premise, I find it offensive because it is the dumbing down America by grossly misrepresenting our history. This is especially appropriate here on the day after Lincoln’s birthday; he must have been rolling in his grave at this monstrous representation of the events of his presidency. This is not history, this is right wingnuts making up rubbish, and stamping it with the false approval of God, to make it appear something else.


A little historical information for comparison, George Washington lost a lot of battles — most of them in fact, did not have a day of prayer, and still won the Revolutionary War. Because that’s often the way the pattern of wars goes, early losses, later wins. Another example, Napoleon won a lot of battles, lost at Waterloo, end of Napoleon, effectively. This is rubbish, this is crap history, this is crap theology, this is religion as superstition, this is a serious break with reality, and cause and effect.


This is FAILED reason, this is FAULTY thinking, this is WRONG WRONG WRONG, but it epitomizes the failures of the right on every topic to seriously address our important issues of the day.


Let me give you a few more examples of right wing insanity under the claimed authority of religion:

and this:



How far should we indulge the anti-vaxxers?

by Dog Gone on February 3, 2015 · 0 comments

There has been so much rubbish from the right wingnuts, including Rand Paul’s totally bogus claim about severe ‘mental disorders’ caused by vaccinations, that is reminiscent of Michele Bachmann’s LIE about HPV Vx and mental retardation. Consider this in the context not only of political liars on the topic of vaccinations, who are blatantly trolling the radical right anti-vaxxers for votes, but also in the context of those who KNOW better, and genuinely do not give a flying …..FIG…..about the painful, debilitating illness or death of you, or your child, or an elderly person in your family that you love, or those with illnesses or injuries that compromise their immune system that you cherish. Here is an example of the ignorant, arrogant, selfish, foolish, and just plain callously cruel anti-vaxxer attitudes, from

If someone told you to your fact that their child was ‘pure’ and they didn’t care if their child caused deafness, brain damage including retardation, sterility, or painful death to your child, you would understandably feel angry. Many people do. All the more so because what the anti-vaxxers believe is factually false, a myth, one being promoted by extremist, radical right wing religious lunatics.

Clearly, except for those who for legitimate medical reasons cannot be vaccinated, it IS time to make vaccinations mandatory, and to end the option of parents choosing not to vaccinate their children for reasons of ‘purity’ or debunked junk science.

I’d like to take it a step further: If someone does not vaccinate their child, or is an unvaccinated adult, and public health authorities trace another child or adult becoming infected with measles to that person and decision, or to someone in their family who is not vaccinated and for whom they are responsible, then I think the infected individual (or an adult acting for them) should be able to sue for damages. Also, municipalities and state and federal agencies should be able to pursue those individuals to recover increased public health costs, over and above what is already budgeted for by their taxes, because of the deliberate causation of additional expense by a few people acting intentionally.

These libertarians like to talk about taking responsibility for themselves and their choices; so let’s hold them to that.  When they cause damages and loss and expense with their choices — make them pay! And/or make them conform to being members of a civilized society. That is really the antithesis of Libertarianism.  But all of us, our society, economy, civilization have a vested interest in living together cooperatively and rationally. No one should be permitted to endanger other people in this way.


MN-06: Newbie Emmer rebuffed, just a little

by Dan Burns on January 8, 2015 · 1 comment

emmer3Well, few of us get everything we want, in life. And I don’t suppose Rep. Tom Emmer (R-MN) can just sue, either.


The Delano Republican has additional responsibilities with his spots on the House agriculture and foreign affairs committees…
He hadn’t expected the foreign affairs appointment. He had initially requested assignment to committees overseeing financial services and transportation, an issue that was a cornerstone of his campaign. So over the next few weeks, he will be attending intensive briefings on foreign policy covering everything from North Korea to Iraq and Afghanistan and the battle against the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
(St. Cloud Times)

If this is tickling your memory about ridiculous-looking committee assignments, Emmer’s predecessor, Michele Bachmann, was on the Select Committee on Intelligence. That one lent itself to a lot of amusing, if at times quite unkind, remarks. Crazy Michele has been talking about wanting a position with a foreign policy “think tank,” where her comprehensive expertise and insight would be invaluable. I’m not making this up. And a place that is aware of what a help her presence can be for fundraising, might well give her a job, despite the credibility hit outside of the base. Most conservative propaganda mills have zero credibility anymore outside of the base, and corporate media, anyway.
Image: MPR


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The importance of local races

by Eric Ferguson on October 15, 2014 · 5 comments

Before she was in Congress, Michele Bachmann was a state senator, and before that, pertinent to the title of this post, she was on her local school board. The fact I don’t have to explain who she is might demonstrate the importance of that one school board race.

It might appear at this point that the importance of local races is stopping crazy people from getting their start in elective office. Not that I’m saying everyone in local elective office is crazy. Just the Republicans. Yes, that’s an overgeneralization. Not all are Bachmann-wannabes. Local offices are, however, the primary bench for candidates for higher office. My impression, which I hope is wrong, is that Republicans are well aware of this while Democrats largely ignore local offices. I mean that in terms of turning out on election day, researching candidates prior to seeing their names on a ballot, and of course in actually running for office. It’s too late to do anything about the last one for 2014, but there’s still time for the first two. We concede these races to Republicans at our peril, as they get to build a bench of people with electoral office while us, not so much.
That’s without even thinking about how local officials do their jobs and affect our lives, apart from their future electoral possibilities. They don’t get national media coverage, much, but when they do, it highlights the effect they can have; the school board in Jefferson County, Colorado, for example. Think the Democrats and independents who skipped last year’s election regret it now? Know how often this happens and we never hear about it? Me neither.
And just to not overlook the obvious, Ferguson, MO: a mostly black and Democratic city, a mostly white and Republican city council, and really low turnout in local elections. Though not equally low across partisan and demographic groups. Think that might explain some things?
Then there’s the effect of the explosion of dark money. We worry about the presidency and Congress being bought, but I’m thinking we saw in 2012 that there’s a limit to how much spending in a presidential race does any good, and I’m skeptical about its benefits beyond a certain point in US Senate races too, but down the ballot is different. It takes little money to swamp a local race. I’m thinking of that referendum in Columbus, Ohio, to raise local taxes to fund the Columbus Zoo. It failed when supporters were surprised and grossly outspent by Koch brothers money, which was used to tell voters their taxes would double when the actual increase was something like 1%. The referendum failed because the Kochs, despite having no connection, just felt ideologically offended and saw a chance to beat a tax increase with a bit of money and a bit of lying, and that was in a big city. Think of the anecdotes you’ve heard of some mayor getting on getting on the bad side of some special interest, and the low spending local race is suddenly hit with massive outside money, like Richmond, CA, where the mayor has $22,000 while his opponent has $1.3 million, courtesy of Chevron:

We’re having a hotly contested race the two at-large school board seats in Minneapolis and it’s drawn a little national attention for the fight over, depending on how you view it, expanding charter schools or privatizing public education. It’s again the exception that proves the rule, because what was the last Minneapolis election to get any national media? There was laughter at our 2013 mayoral race because our combination of an open seat and a $20 filing fee drew in 30-something candidates, but otherwise, that’s it for attention. And that’s in a city the size of Minneapolis. The only time I can recall St. Paul’s elections being noticed was when nominally DFL Mayor Randy Kelly endorsed George Bush in 2004, so some national media were watching as he got blown out in 2005. Those are the only instances I know of for cities the size of Minneapolis and St. Paul, so how much can we count on the media telling us about our own local races?
The answer is “not much”.


Last Thursday, Kris Kobach, the radical right wing extremists Secretary of State for Kansas, lost a state Supreme Court battle regarding the 2014 ballot in that state.  Kobach tried to keep the Democratic candidate from withdrawing from the election.  The state Supreme Court voted unanimously,regardless of political preference or affiliation,  that Kobach did NOT have that ‘discretion’ to treat the Democratic candidate differently from other candidates.

from the Powerline blog:

The cited statute provides:
Any person who has been nominated by any means for any national, state, county or township office who declares that they [sic] are incapable of fulfilling the duties of office if elected may cause such person’s name to be withdrawn from nomination by a request in writing, signed by the person and acknowledged before an officer qualified to take acknowledgments of deeds.

Taylor having made no acknowledgment of incapability to serve, Kobach ruled that Taylor would stay on the ballot as the Democratic nominee this November. This point of the whole Democratic charade being to get Taylor off the ballot and get Democrats behind Orman, Taylor followed up with an appeal to the Kansas Supreme Court. Having made his withdrawal “pursuant to” the statute, Taylor argued that he incorporated the statutory requirement of incapability by reference. This week the Kansas Supreme Court unanimously agreed:

We conclude the plain meaning of “pursuant to K.S.A. 25-306b(b)” contained in Taylor’s letter effectively declares he is incapable of fulfilling the duties of office if elected. Simply put, the phrase operates as an incorporation by reference of this particular requirement.


Powerline blog, a conservative site, doesn’t like the court decision, never mind that it treats all candidates alike rather than different, rather than giving preference to one political party over another.


What has been largely absent from the media coverage is that Kobach quietly skulked away with his tail between his legs on Saturday, and complied with federal and state law:
From Politico:


TOPEKA, Kan. — Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach has directed county election officials to start mailing ballots to voters overseas Saturday without having a Democratic nominee listed for the U.S. Senate.
The Democrat dropped out of the race against three-term Republican Sen. Pat Roberts, pushed out by some party leaders who wanted to improve the chances that independent candidate Greg Orman would defeat Roberts.

Kobach spokeswoman Samantha Poetter confirmed Friday that the secretary of state had decided against delaying the mailing of ballots to military personnel and other U.S. citizens overseas. He had said Thursday that the deadline for starting the mailings would be pushed back to Sept. 27.


Why was that an attempt to cheat by Kobach and the Republicans?


That would be because the incumbent Republican is losing, but is losing by LESS if the vote is split three ways rather than two.