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66758002People are working to try to get President Obama to come through in doing more to help protect women’s fundamental right to reproductive choice.
 

Anti-women, right-wing extremists in Congress are relentless in their commitment to take health care, including abortions, away from women. One of the most powerful tools they have is the Hyde Amendment, passed in 1976, which prohibits the use of federal funds for any health benefits coverage that includes abortion…
 
It’s bad enough that women have to fight so hard to defend their constitutional rights against right-wing Republican extremists. It’s even worse when Democrats are also standing in the way. The Hyde Amendment has been re-authorized every year for the past 39 years, under Democratic presidents and with Congress in Democratic control. When President Obama ran for president he promised he would work to end Hyde’s dangerous intrusion on “a poor woman’s decision to terminate her pregnancy.” He has failed to follow through on that promise, not only by endorsing Hyde in each of his seven budgets but by allowing the Stupak Amendment to strip access to abortion from ObamaCare.
(Credo Action)

Related items:
 
“States added another 47 abortion restrictions in 2015. No doubt there are more to come.”
 
“Groups Push Obama to Clarify U.S. Abortion Funding for Wartime Rape.”
 

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Bill Clinton vs. Clown Trump

by Dog Gone on January 7, 2016 · 0 comments

donaldtrumpfoolyear-354x470Bill Clinton is an extremely popular former president, more popular than any recent past president and more popular than the current sitting president, Obama, and much more popular than any recent Republican president (either Bush), per insidegov.com.  President Bubba is generally regarded as the most popular president of the past 25 years.

 
THAT makes Bill Clinton a major threat to the potential success of Donald Trump, as a major asset to Hillary Clinton.  Since Bill cannot be elected to a third (or fourth) term as president, it is arguably the next best thing to elect him first spouse, putting him back in the White House in what would presumably be at the very least an advisory capacity.
 

As a substantive thinker and accomplished speaker, aka the Explainer in Chief, Bill by simply existing, by doing ‘that thing he does’, underlines the failings and shortfalls of Trump in every important category, including appearing presidential, without ever acknowledging Trump by name.
 

It is a weakness on the part of the thrice-married Trump to go after either of the Clintons for any issue relating to marital infidelity, given his own egregiously bad track record in that regard.  While Trump’s excuses for his infidelity has been that he was too busy with his work to be a good husband, it is a hard sell that he was busier, or had more obligations and responsibilities than the leader of the free world.  And Bill Clinton has survived his public womanizing scandals just fine — and those scandals have NEVER translated into his being unsympathetic to the advancement of gender equality.
 
>UNLIKE Donald Trump, Bill Clinton has never been accused of domestic violence towards his wife or any other woman.  And contrary to claims by Trump, Bill Clinton never ‘lost’ or was denied a license to practice law either.  But Trump and his conservative supporters don’t value facts in the slightest.  They thrive on attitude over substance.
 

There is every possibility that attacking Bill Clinton to get to Hillary Clinton will backfire on ‘the Donald’, who is more of a cartoon character than a serious candidate.
 

The Chicago Tribune noted just today, in covering Bill Clinton:

 

The former president is the most resilient politician of this, and probably any, era. He seemed doomed when the sex scandal involving a White House intern erupted during his presidency. Republicans then foolishly tried to remove him from office for lying about sex. That backfired: Bill Clinton led his party to unusual gains in the 1998 midterm elections and left office in 2001 with a 66 percent approval rating.

 
Even right wing nut not-news, Newsmax, home of crackpot conspiracy theories and fact-free rubbish, noted that failing right wing extremist candidate and former Arkansas governor and purveyor of quack diabetes cure,  Mike Huckster-be, admits that Bill Clinton is extremely popular — even among Republicans, a huge concession from the far right.

 

GOP candidate Mike Huckabee said Monday that he does not agree with critics who say Bill Clinton will be a liability for Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign, saying that even Republicans would pick the former president after seven years of President Barack Obama. …”He’s still popular with a lot of Americans. Frankly, after seven years of Obama, a lot of Republicans would take Bill Clinton back, warts and all, just because at least he understood how to govern. He was not the kind of person who utterly demonized the other side legislatively.”

 
Meanwhile, Turnip-top Trump is broadly viewed as a huge – or ‘YUGE’ embarrassment, and never more so than while our closest ally, the UK, is debating banning Trump from visiting the country. The king of rubbish plans for border walls is being kept out – such poetic justice, such pure and unadulterated Karma. In spite of his inexplicable emotional rather than substantive appeal to Republicans, (because there IS NOTHING substantive about Trump) it is unlikely that he will succeed in attacks against either Hillary or Bill Clinton using this lame and extraordinarily hypocritical appeal.  I would expect that we will be seeing proxies for Clinton underlining this moral failing on the part of Turnip-top.

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plannedThe Colorado Springs attack was not some rare outlier.
 

Threats and attacks on abortion providers have spiked dramatically in the four months since an anti-abortion group calling itself the Center for Medical Progress released a series of heavily edited videos purporting to show Planned Parenthood officials “selling baby parts.” In September, the FBI noted an increase in cyber attacks and arsons, and warned that it was “likely criminal or suspicious incidents will continue to be directed against reproductive health care providers, their staff and facilities.” In October, a Planned Parenthood facility in California was fire-bombed, following three similar incidents in Illinois, Louisiana, and Washington. A clinic in New Hampshire was spray-painted with the word “murderer,” and then, a few weeks later, attacked by an intruder wielding a hatchet.
(The Nation)

Throughout the recent escalation of violence by anti-choice zealots, as well as the longer-term rise in threats, intimidation, and criminality, the Obama administration has largely confined itself to serious-sounding talk, presumably because of the common “wisdom” that abortion is a losing issue for Democrats. That’s not just pitiful. It’s gross dereliction of the duties of their offices. The FBI undoubtedly knows who is running the forced-birth terrorist groups. Arrest, prosecute, convict, and imprison them. If the fee-fees of the anti-choice minority get hurt in the process, tough.

 
Note how Planned Parenthood and its many, many millions of supporters aren’t calling for the deportation of all white anti-choice males, or making them register in a government database, or anything like that. Progressives, unlike too many conservatives, do not turn into whimpering blobs of quivering gel every time something bad happens in this world.
 
(Addendum: A list of attacks on abortion providers going back to 1976.)
 

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clown carThere was an odd moment during the last Republican debate. Just one? Well, this one was mostly missed, though it jumped out to me. John Kasich said, “I was on Morning Joe at a town hall, and a young student stood up and said, ‘Can I still be idealistic?'” It was odd because, first, does any real person talk like that? Maybe so, but the second oddity is Kasich trying to appeal to young voters, because that hasn’t exactly been his strength lately.
 
During a recent town hall at the University of Richmond, Kasich had students behind him where they could appear on camera, but getting him to take a student’s question was evidently a lower priority. When finally he called on a student, before she could ask her question, he decided to anticipate her question by saying “I’m sorry, I don’t have any Taylor Swift concert tickets.” Sure, because what else might a young adult be interested in? No need to take my word for it that she felt patronized. Take hers.
 

The older members of the audience chuckled as my friends’ jaws dropped to the floor. It was astonishingly clear that Gov. Kasich did not come to Richmond for my vote.
 

While the lectures were condescending, the real issue was that Kasich chose not to listen to students in his forum. Most of the questions came from older members of the community, many vocalizing their support of Kasich before throwing him a softball question. Kasich barreled through a Planned Parenthood question, dismissing the young woman who posed it, and derided me when I had the audacity to raise my hand. Kasich came to Richmond to pander to retired Republicans. He could gain points by belittling me and my peers, so that’s what he did.
 
What continues to strike me is the hypocrisy of his condescension. He touted his ambitious energy as an 18-year-old man, but as soon as I, an 18-year-old woman, exhibited ambition, I became the target of his joke. The same passion that drove Kasich to speak with President Nixon drove me to ask the candidate a question I care deeply about.

This is the candidate touting that a student asked him a question about idealism? The reason Kasich would say that in the debate is obvious. He’s trying to signal to Republicans that he can address their problem with younger voters because they respond to him. Well, looks like “respond” can be negative as well as positive.
 
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Invited Guest Commentary

by Invenium Viam on October 25, 2015 · 1 comment

Movie Review: Suffragette

Betty Folliard

Betty Folliard is a former state legislator, founder of ERA Minnesota and Executive Producer and host of A Woman’s Place (www.awomansplacemn.com) on AM950Radio.

by Betty Folliard

 

I recently saw the sneak preview of the movie “Suffragette” with a friend (soon to open in Minnesota on November 6th). The film is a powerful call to action.

 

Seeing the hardships women endured and the fight it took over many decades just to secure the right for women to vote – let alone to be treated with justice – made me once again grateful for those who took up the cause. The film also make people acutely aware that our struggle for equality is unfinished.

 

There is no constitutional protection against gender-based discrimination in our constitution. Religion, race, national origin, and even guns are all “suspect classifications” afforded strict scrutiny under the law, but gender is missing from that list.

 

An Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) would protect Americans from the whims of Congress. Without this constitutional protection, all of our piecemeal laws dealing with discrimination on the basis of gender are nails without a hammer.

 

Contrary to public belief, the ERA did not pass last century. Minnesota ratified the ERA, but the effort fell three states short of passage before an arbitrary deadline took effect scuttling the momentum. Now there is a renewed effort to pass the ERA. Seven of ten Minnesota congressional members are co-authors of legislation to remove the sunset on the ERA. Only three more states need to ratify the ERA to finally embed it in our federal constitution. If you live in districts represented by Congressmen John Kline, Tom Emmer, or Erik Paulsen, ask your congressman to sign onto HJRes51. At the state level, ERA Minnesota activists from every corner of the state will push a state constitutional amendment that mirrors the federal ERA, alongside our resolution to Congress to remove the sunset on the ERA – an effort which passed through the Senate 55-6 this year.

 

Take action. Ask the question of our presidential candidates: If elected, will they champion the ERA?.

 

Then take more action. The next Minnesota Legislative session begins on International Women’s Day – March 8th. This is an unique opportunity to highlight the unfinished business of pay inequity, violence against women, pregnancy discrimination and laws that unequally discriminate against men – all the issues that will be addressed by an ERA into our constitution. ERA Minnesota will be there that day in numbers too big to ignore. Help us make equality a reality.

 

Suffragists drafted the ERA amendment in 1921. See the film. Join the fray.

 
Comment below fold.
 
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Zealots raid Planned Parenthood clinics in Texas

by Dan Burns on October 23, 2015 · 0 comments

plannedThis is potentially very, very serious. If fanatical anti-woman, anti-choice creeps get away with it – which is clearly a precursor to whole new levels of harassment and efforts at baseless criminal prosecution – in Texas, much of the rest of the country, where the same sort of people sadly are in charge, will follow.
 

Texas sent agents to Planned Parenthood facilities on Thursday seeking documents, the group said, calling it a “politically motivated” move that comes on the heels of the state’s Republican leaders barring it from receiving Medicaid money.
 
Members of the Texas Office of the Inspector General made unannounced visits at Planned Parenthood health centers in Houston, Dallas and San Antonio, staying in some cases for several hours and giving Planned Parenthood 24 hours to deliver thousands of pages of documents stored at its facilities across the state, the organization said…
 
“We believe this is a fishing expedition,” Planned Parenthood of the Texas Capital Region Chief Executive Officer Ken Lambrecht told a news conference in Austin, calling the request “politically motivated.”
 
Lambrecht said Texas had requested what Planned Parenthood sees as unnecessary information such as the home addresses of all its employees as well as their salaries and bonuses.
(Reuters)

Thus far, throughout the attacks on PP, the response from many politically powerful, purportedly committed defenders of women’s rights and women’s health, starting with President Obama himself, has been pitifully inadequate. That needs to change, now.
 

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Conservatives support Christian theocracy.  Earlier this week, one of them in another state put it in writing.  From the America blog:

Yesterday, Win Johnson, a lawyer working directly under Moore, wrote a letter to public officials in the state calling them to defy the Supreme Court’s ruling. As Johnson wrote, in part

Public officials are ministers of God assigned the duty of punishing the wicked and protecting the righteous. If the public officials decide to officially approve of the acts of the wicked, they must logically not protect the righteous from the wicked. In fact, they must become protectors of the wicked. You cannot serve two masters; you must pick – God or Satan.

…Public official, what will you do? Will you stand up for the law of Alabama, for the people, for the weak and vulnerable, for the law of God? Or will you capitulate? Will you become complicit in the takeover by the wicked?

Johnson is the director of legal staff for Alabama’s Administrative Office of Courts, which runs the state’s court system. While the letter was addressed to all public officials in the state, a spokesperson for Alabama Governor Robert Bentley said that it was directed at him.

No. Public officials are NOT ministers of God.  That is why there is specified in the constitution that there can be no religious test for public office.  Conservatives don’t care about the constitution. They want theocracy in spite of it.

 

Earlier this week, Kim Davis had another legal battle loss, looking to be one of many before she ends her grandstanding against the LGBT with a petulant whine.

 

After telling ABC Good Morning America viewers that she had a gay friend, the Daily Beast went looking for that friend; that gay friend may not be a friend any more. Davis appears to be out of sync with her town and county:

 

“Even after this all started, I went in a few days later and we spoke,” he told The Daily Beast. “We talked about how each other were feeling, and how we’re gonna be friends even after all this.”

But after the media frenzy, Black feels like he doesn’t know that woman anymore.

“I really don’t know who Kim is at the moment. I really want to believe that the kind, sweet person who was there when my mom passed away is still there,” he said. “I was friends with Kim in the past, but I don’t know this woman I’ve been seeing.”

Black said Davis’ decision to fight so hard against marriage licenses for gay couples was surprising to him and that he feels she’s taking it to an extreme. Black also notes that Davis didn’t become a Christian until four years ago.

What really bothers Black is how she has has transformed the town of Morehead, Kentucky.

“Kim Davis has become the face of Morehead, and that’s not the face we want to portray,” he said.

Black says Morehead is considered one of the most progressive towns in Kentucky, and that the city council passed an LGBT non-discrimination ordinance in 2013, one of only six cities to do so in the state. He says many LGBT Kentuckians choose the town as a home  for its diverse and accepting  environment.This is kind of like a sanctuary for people who came to [Morehead State University]. They live here now, they’ve made it their home because it’s so progressive,” he said. “And now it’s like, what is this place we live in? This is not the home we know. We don’t feel safe now. That’s ultimately what she did. She made us feel like our home was invaded by strangers, and she made us strangers to it.”
This is kind of like a sanctuary for people who came to [Morehead State University]. They live here now, they’ve made it their home because it’s so progressive,” he said. “And now it’s like, what is this place we live in? This is not the home we know. We don’t feel safe now. That’s ultimately what she did. She made us feel like our home was invaded by strangers, and she made us strangers to it.”

But taking theocracy to the extreme is what conservatives DO. And that is why every effort at pushing theocracy on government at any level should be opposed, vigorously. Here is just the latest abuse of religion in government to hit the news, demonstrating exactly how the extremist religious right pursues preferential religious treatment, and attempts to control everyone else.

“When citizens of this country approach their government, they do so only as Americans, not as a members of one faith or another. And that means that even in a partly legislative body, they should not confront government-sponsored worship that divides them along religious lines.”

Associate Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan, in a dissenting  Supreme Court opinion

The Kim Davis controversy is like other right-wing efforts to support theocracy and to undo the decisions of the SCOTUS which are mandated by our Constitution as the ultimate arbiters of what is and is not constitutional.  We saw it in the Hobby Lobby decision, we have seen it in other attempts at challenging marriage equality.  When conservatives dislike a ruling, they attempt a do-over and use the litigation as a delay to social justice.

 
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fashion two-fer: reigious bigot hood AND dunce cap

The Kim Davis fight has been timed and located carefully to provide one last wedge-issue boost to conservative voter turn out in an off-year election in Kentucky.  It’s not about same-sex marriage or individual rights of religious expression, that is a red herring.  Kim Davis is a pawn and a stooge trustingly serving the larger aims and agenda of the radical right.  She might as well appear in public in a dunce cap, (as well as a scarlet letter).

 

It is always wise not to let the opposition define – or name – the debate, the argument, the issue, but to look at what is involved without their labels.  That might sound cynical, and maybe it is — but it is also realistic.

 

The governor’s race to replace term-limited popular Democratic governor Steve Beshear takes place in a low turnout year that has neither a presidential race, nor any races for the House of Representatives or Senate.  Even the state legislature elections take place in even numbered years.  The 2015 races tend to get overlooked in all but local media coverage.

 

not an image of the real Kim Davis
but VERY very similar

If the liberal candidate wins, then BOTH Obamacare/Kynect AND same sex marriage will have a strong supporter in the executive branch; if not, if the tea party extremist candidate wins, then there will be continued organized opposition to both, and continued encroaching theocracy in Kentucky government.

 

The first of several debates by the candidates for governor takes place today:

 

“It will be an opportunity to hear from the three candidates on a range of issues,” said WKYT political editor Bill Bryant is among the panelists questioning the candidates. “I suspect everything from the controversy involving Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis to underfunded pensions will come up during the debate.”
Going into the race, Conway was well-known for his recent high-profile, headline-grabbing failed battle against now Sen. Rand Paul and his emotional decision to not appeal a judge’s order for Kentucky to recognize same-sex marriages from other states and countries while Bevin most recently tangled with Sen. Mitch McConnell who defeated him in the 2014 Republican primary.
The latest Bluegrass Poll from July 30 showed Conway with a slight lead over Bevin.
In a two-person governor’s race, Bevin suffered because 15 percent of those polled said they are “very conservative” but would cross-over and vote for the Democrat Conway. Bevin needs every one of these “very conservative” votes to win, according to SurveyUSA which conducted the poll which found 13 percent of likely voters remain undecided.
When all registered voters were asked which of the two is better qualified to deal with the state worker pension system, voters split: 37 percent named Conway, 36 percent named Bevin. When registered voters were asked who is better qualified to manage the state’s budget, voters split: 38 percent said Conway, 38 percent said Bevin.

Conservatives do well in low-turnout elections; they do not do well when voters participate in representative government.  To accomplish this, conservatives use wedge issues to turn out their voters, and they those wedge issues tend to be most effective with their most extreme and fringe voters. This is CENTRAL to the Kim Davis issue.  It is an attempt to turn out the religious right, in part by making Kim Davis important, and by extension, making their pro-theocracy a turn-out wedge-issue.  Less useful for this as an an anti-gay wedge issue is the problem for the right that same-sex marriage, like Obamacare, is gaining support on the right, although slowly; hence the need to redefine the issue as religious freedom for right wing radicals.

 

The legal battle of Kim Davis is nominally about individual religious freedom to persecute others citing sincere beliefs.  Nominally, according to the reference site dictionary.com, means “by or as regards name; in name; ostensibly”.  To name the Kim Davis legal fight ‘individual freedom’ is false; even to name it a fight about gay marriage is deceptive.

 

The Kim Davis issue is really about larger conservative control of government through the Kentucky 2015 election cycle, especially the election of the next governor; and 2016 election cycle.  It is really about issues like Obamacare, and the most successful state version of Obamacare in Kentucky, called Kynect, and attempts to replace a liberal governor with an extremist conservative successor who is campaigning on repeal of both Obamacare and the extremely popular Kynect.  Candidate Conway is part of the Bashear administration

 

So HOW Governor Steve Bashear, a supporter of same-sex marriage in spite of his ‘primitive Baptist’ family background handles the Kim Davis controversy is important to far more than the rule of law and the decision of the SCOTUS, in Kentucky.  While liberals call for Kim Davis to be impeached, the Kentucky governor with the Middle Eastern Muslim sounding name understands that is NOT the most effective way to promote justice and civil rights, as a practical matter.

 

Bashear knows that while in a rational society appreciates why government is and must remain secular, his legislature containing a 9 member Republican majority in the state senate and an 8 member Republican majority in the state House, won’t do their job to ensure secularism.  Bashear is correct when he refers to calling a special election as a waste of money; it would also be politically stupid in the extreme.  Bashear is correct in relying on the courts to slowly and laboriously ensure civil rights for all adults seeking to marry legally in the state of Kentucky.

 

SHOULD the legislative branch do their job, and impeach Kim Davis. Yes. HELL yes. This should not have to go through the courts, but it is precisely because we have a belt-and-suspenders provision in our government not to rely on only one branch of government built into the system that it works.  And a person who understands the system, the intentionally designed features of our government, like Steve Bashear, uses them to govern effectively.

 

The legislature at best would do nothing if called into special session; but at worst the legislature could very likely, in view of the current elections in progress, OBSTRUCT same sex marriage in Kentucky further, or at the very least make political hay for the right by attempting to do so and by turning this into more of a wedge issue than it currently is in the governor’s race.

 

As of recent polls, the two leading candidates for governor were in a statistical tie.  Bashear is smart enough not to tip the boat in favor of the tea party candidate, but rather to let the provisions of government that keeps the Kim Davis issue safely in the hands of the court take it’s course…. which will likely not be resolved until well after the 2015 elections for governor.

 

Given what he has done in Kentucky, democrats could do worse than put Bashear on the short lists for a possible VP running mate, especially if his successor in this election is another liberal.  He is a man who understands the practical function of government for good, which is I would argue the highest praise one can give a person in elected office.

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This is a long post, but if you don’t have the time or interest to read all of it, I encourage you to at least skim the examples, from a variety of current events news, of religion enforced by government officials intruding into the lives of people who should be protected from that by our constitution. They range from losing your kids under a religious judge, to being fired for not going to church, to being stopped in the street and prayed at by cops at a road block that exists ONLY for the purposes of them pushing their religion on you.  I believe the examples below are both shocking but also significant to the arguments of freedom of religion being practiced on the job by people who are also exercising the authority of government at the same time.

 

Kim Davis, Rowan County Clerk, Kentucky doesn’t want to do her job serving the public — the WHOLE public, and now is not serving the public much at all.  She wants her bigotry to supersede the rights of others on the faulty premise of the exercise of religious freedom.

 

Kim Davis got out of jail and went back to her office this week, beginning the week with a big bang, and ending it with a whimper and another loss in court.

 

To the religious right, this does not seem like such a big deal; people can get served elsewhere, so what if religion by a government employee is disrupting the function of government, so what if people are suffering very real discrimination in having to go outside their home area to get married.  The inconvenience, cost, and difficulty are exactly what they WANT, the chance to stick their finger in the eye of people with whom they disagree.

 

That is the most they can hope for as public consensus continues to grow AGAINST their bias and hatred, including conservative opinion locally  but also nationally,

 

So why should we NOT allow anyone in the capacity of a government official or exercising the authority and legal force of government to also exercise their religious preferences (or preferences they try to justify on the pretext of religion)?

 

Let’s look at a few of the more egregious examples from the news. From the Free Thinker, reporting below on a part of America outside the 50 states.  This applies as an example because Puerto Rico is a part of the US, subject to the same freedom of religion provision of our own Constitution AND the Constitution of Puerto Rico, which mandates even more specifically the separation of church and state.  And this STILL happened.  It is significant because of two points – that a roadblock for reasons other than police purposes is a really serious intrusion on individual freedom to go about one’s life and business, an intrusion that most people would resent; and secondly because it demonstrates that intruding one’s religion into how government is conducted amounts not only to giving preferential treatment of one religion over others, but to an unfair subsidizing of the practice and promotion of that religion with tax payer funds and government authority.

 

You should not have to make the choice to refuse to be proselytized to someone wearing a uniform and badge, and carrying a gun and handcuffs.  That is intimidating.

 

It is also the same argument against Kim Davis (minus guns and handcuffs).

‘In the name of Jesus, step out of your car’

An atheist group in Puerto Rico has lodged a formal complaint against police who subjected motorists to a ‘faith’ blitz on July 1.

‘In the name of Jesus, step out of your car’

In a statement issued yesterday, Elisaul Rodriguez, Vice-President of Ateístas de Puerto Rico (Atheists of Puerto Rico) alleged that a “faith road block” had been set up by Barceloneta City police.

Officers stopped people on the road for the purpose of preaching, distributing written religious propaganda and praying for drivers.

Rodriguez added:

It was a religious activity in which the Christian faith was professed, particularly of an Evangelical variant.
We understand that the Police Department of Barceloneta City has incurred violations to the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico …

Article II, Section III says: ‘No law related to the establishment of any religion will be approved and the free exercise of religion will not be prohibited. There will be complete separation of church and state’.
We must also point out that Puerto Rico, as a territory, is under the protection of the Federal Constitution of the United States of America, which also provides a clause for the separation of church and state.

Acts carried out during the “faith road-block” reflected the officers’ personal religious interests and were outside the police departments scope of duty, Rodriguez pointed out. The officers wore their uniforms and badges and:

Used resources provided by the Government of Puerto Rico that should only be used for the purpose of fighting crime, not for personal religious benefits.

This sends the message that the State is Christianizing its citizens, which corresponds to a canonical government and impairs the integrity and impartiality of the State.

Then in ultra-conservative crazy failure Kansas, we have this law suit over a woman being fired for not attending an evangelical church on her own time on weekends, or religious services held in government buildings on government time using government provided resources.

 

It’s not like this is the only example either of the illegal intersection of cops and religion in Puerto Rico; there was this law suit just two years ago in the case of another cop protesting religious conformity in the police force, from nbc latino.

 

Do you want the government to have the power to enforce religious conformity with the religion of elected officials?  Keep in mind this is exactly the thing that the crazy radical right fears unreasonably happening with Sharia law – government enforcement of extremist religious people, forcing you to do and to profess belief in things with which you disagree.

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The bad old days of puritans, religious police, and an official (or unofficial) state religion. Not an actual rendering of the image of Kim Davis, although there are distinct similarities.

“There’s nothing more self-righteous than a reformed whore.” – aphorism

Judge not, that ye be not judged. For with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged: and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again. And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother’s eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?  Matthew 7:1-3

“You shall not commit adultery.”  Exodus 20:14

“If a man is found sleeping with another man’s wife, both the man who slept with her and the woman must die.” Deuteronomy 22:22

“If a man commits adultery with another man’s wife–with the wife of his neighbor–both the adulterer and the adulteress must be put to death.” Leviticus 20:10

Anyone who divorces his wife and marries another woman commits adultery against her.  And if she divorces her husband and marries another man, she commits adultery.” Mark 10:11-12

“Anyone who divorces his wife and marries another woman commits adultery, and the man who marries a divorced woman commits adultery.” Luke 16:18

There is nothing in the Bible, old or new testament, about conversion exceptions or exclusions for adultery. And from Wikipedia about Ms. Davis:

“Davis has been married four times to three different men. The first three marriages ended in divorce in 1994, 2006, and 2008. She is the mother of twins, who were born five months after her divorce from her first husband. Her third husband is the biological father of the twins, who were adopted by her second husband, Joe, who is also her fourth and current husband. Joe supports her stance against same-sex marriage. One of Davis’s twin sons, Nathan, works in her office as a deputy clerk and has taken the same position of denying marriage licenses to same-sex couples.”

Kim Davis, county clerk of Rowan county, Kentucky, is a sincere but “cafeteria” (selective Christian) born-again Apostolic Christian.  The Bible has  a lot to say condemning adultery, but very little that addresses monogamy (marriage to only one woman) or same-sex relationships.  The few quotations interpreted against the LGBT and same sex relationships are far fewer and of far more dubious authenticity and significance than those against adultery, which are better established, frequent and unequivocal in interpretation.   Goody for her.  Given the chaos of her past personal life, and her inability to conform to ethical and moral decision making on her own, I can see why she might have needed the crutch of religion, and sought out an extreme version of religion to counter her own extreme poor behavior in her private life.   However, while I was shocked the first time I heard the lead quotation of this post; since then I’ve come to appreciate the validity of the observation that those who are religiously reformed, like Kim Davis, are too-often the most zealously excessive and extreme in their views, and all too eager and willing to enforce those beliefs on others, willing or otherwise, through persuasion or coercion.  Kim Davis, those like her, those who support her, are all too eager and too willing to ‘save’ other people from exercising their right to make a possible mistake in determining their own lives, including who they love and marry, which is the very ESSENCE of freedom.  Instead they seek to impose a narrow, puritanical, theocratic religious nanny state on them, denying them their constitutionally guaranteed civil rights.  I strongly doubt that Ms. Davis would have accepted the interference of a county bureaucrat telling her she could not seek a divorce, or a license to remarry because she would be committing adultery, for example, even though her conversion came while working in the county office as a deputy clerk where this was a real issue, a frequent occurrence – divorces for adultery, and subsequent marriages, including her own.

As a self-styled supporter of Biblical marriage, Ms. Davis has a lot of catching up to do, and it appears she hopes to do so by denying the civil and religious freedoms of others, and instead imposing her own.  Given how badly she screwed up without religion, it is perhaps understandable she now seeks to save everyone else by forcing her new-found (4 years) religion on them to save them from exercising their own freedom of choice and action – and religion. Or maybe she thinks it makes up for her own adultery.

 

I can’t really see that Davis is a deep thinker, but rather she comes across as a right wing religious fanatic who has become the willing stooge, the compliant pawn, of the radical religious right.

 

Given how quickly bigot bucks dry up after the first flush of notoriety, it seems far more likely that Ms. Davis is headed for more real life sorrow and catastrophe, not some sort of happy martyrdom that translates into subsequent success, and that her religious conversion and subsequent attempts at anti-LGBT martyrdom will be just one more bad choice in a long line of bad choices.   In her 2014 election, Davis won over her opponent by approx. 6.4% of the vote, and won over her primary challenger by only 0.6% of the primary vote.  With the exception of her son, her employees in the clerk’s office do not support her, and only complied out of fear. From Think Progress:

 

In an editorial note accompanying its reporting, the Trial Court Review paints a grim picture of life in the Rowan County courthouse after Davis began a symbol of anti-gay defiance. “The takeaways from the Watkins interview are clear. Davis is acting alone in her zealous mission. Her conduct has terrorized not just her staff but everyone that works in the courthouse. And all for a foolish mission aided by out of state charlatan lawyers trying to raise money for their ‘religious liberty’ mission.”

The county seat, per the AP, doesn’t seem to be happy with Davis and the attention it has brought to their county either.  That seems to be far more the action and wishes of outside agitators.  I would argue strongly that it is a mistake for Davis to give greater emphasis to these outside exploiters of her position, over the wishes of her community, given her election numbers just last year.  More than most, her politics need to be local.  The 2014 election was Davis’ first term; I don’t see her getting a second term with her stunt, however piously sincere.   Per the AP this morning:

 

Residents of Rowan County want things to return to normal

MOREHEAD, Ky. (AP) — Residents of the eastern Kentucky town where a county clerk was jailed for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples say they want things back to normal. Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis was jailed for five days for refusing a federal judge’s order. Her resistance attracted news media and protesters from all over the country and forced residents of this eastern Kentucky community to confront each other with deeply held beliefs they hadn’t been talking about that much. The Rowan County Rights Organization suspended all protests against Davis on Wednesday. Spokeswoman Nashia Fife said it has been a difficult time since most of the groups’ members know Davis and her family. Local pastor Randy Smith said the situation will embolden Christians and gay rights activists alike. But he said both sides can live together in peace.

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