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MN-05: Who should replace Rep. Keith Ellison?

by Mike Kiepe on December 10, 2016 · 1 comment

The leaders of the Minnesota DFL have a chance to show the world they learned from the political debacle of 2016 when they endorse the replacement of Congressman Keith Ellison should he step down to become chair of the Democratic National Committee.
 
Many consider South Minneapolis as the most diverse neighborhood in the state. Ellison’s successor should represent this diversity and continue the political revolution stared by Sen Bernie Sanders.
 
Why mention Sanders? Because the DNC and by extension the Minnesota DFL have lost their way.
 
Sanders and his millions of supporters, including young people, showed the world the path to victory in 2016. Anyone who attended the caucus at the Green School (4th Ave South and 35th Street) witnessed the overwhelming support for Our Revolution in South Minneapolis.
 
The DFL must endorse a candidate who personifies this way forward and not the past failures of a party out of touch with poor and working voters.
 
Victory in 2018 and 2020 depends on building a political base for all people, and not tired old ideas from a defeated Democratic establishment.
 

The press is already throwing State Senator Jeff Hayden’s name around. Hayden has some baggage concerning the scandal at Community Action Minneapolis and questions raised about his travel expenses. He was also a strong supporter of Hillary Clinton.
 
Hayden has trouble with signage as well–as seen this summer on the 4000 block of 3rd Ave South. He ran unopposed for State Senate but his signs said State Representative.
 
hayden

 

The DFL needs to come up with a real candidate to succeed Keith Ellison, someone exciting and who truly represents the diversity of the district.
 
Voterpov.com
 
Comments:
 
From Eric Ferguson:
To be fair to Sen. Hayden, that sign could be a supporter reusing an old sign. Nothing a candidate can do about that. I reuse old signs. I don’t have any with the wrong office, but I do have old ones that don’t mention the candidate is now an incumbent.

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