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MN lege: False GOP claims on state spending growth

by Dan Burns on May 13, 2017

minnesota_state_capitolI gotta tell you all, righteous people, thank goodness for the NSPI. I haven’t checked closely, but I strongly suspect that most of this state’s corporate media is pretty much just repeating the Party of Trump’s claims on this, verbatim.
 
(I purposely limited the blockquote, so you have to click to see the chart, and may as well read the rest while you’re there. It is most enlightening. A definitive example of how right-wingers, shall we say, “manipulate” facts, in a case like this by relying on the cumulative effect of many small misrepresentations, rather than one or two big ones that are more likely to send up red flags. And how that is rarely noted with any prominence in corporate media.)
 

A recent chart from the Republican Party of Minnesota, reproduced below, purports to show that Minnesota’s general fund budget is growing about 12 percent faster than the state’s economy and about 25 percent faster than the rate of inflation from 2012 to 2017. The information in that graph is, however, generally inaccurate…
 
The bottom line is that the first five bars in the GOP chart, shown to contrast with spending growth, are off-base — and most of them woefully so. Because the height of each of these bars is significantly to dramatically understated, the effect of the chart exaggerates projected state spending growth relative to the factors represented by these bars.
 
Of course, no mention is made of what was accomplished with the increased state spending since 2012, including a halt to the decade long decline in real per pupil E-12 funding, the establishment of statewide all-day kindergarten, targeted property tax relief and an expansion of the Working Family Credit that contributed to a significant reduction in Minnesota tax regressivity, increases in funding for higher education that helped to stem the tide of soaring tuition, increased funding for county and city services to replace a portion of the state aid that was cut over the preceding ten years, and other investments in affordable housing and health care—all achieved without an increase in the effective tax rate paid by most middle-income Minnesotans.
(North Star Policy Institute)

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