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More Hell or Health Care?

by Barbarara on February 16, 2013

If you talk about the fiscal cliff that we just went over in December and January, most people roll their eyes back in their head, their tongues hang out, and they start to drool.  Few people know there were at least two big give-aways to health insurance companies, who are no dummies.

Insurance companies do not like competition.  They have been buying up the smaller companies like crazy. Does United Health come to mind? Insurers in Minnesota made sure that there isn’t any competition here either.  Minnesota is one of the states that had a health care co-op plan, but it was axed along with 39 others as you’ll read about here.

Wendell Potter, author of an expose about health insurance companies, now works for The Center for Public Integrity. On February 4, 2013 he wrote OPINION: favors for special interests-Insurers and drug companies and their armies of lobbyists get what they pay for on Capitol Hill http://www.publicintegrity.org… (Retrieved February 15, 2013)

1.  ”In an effort to create more competition, consumer-friendly lawmakers inserted a provision in ObamaCare to make federal dollars available through loans to groups hoping to set up nonprofit co-op health plans in every state.

Insurers tried without success to get that provision stripped out of the final bill, and they have been working relentlessly since the bill was passed to get regulations written in such a way to make life more difficult for the co-ops.

Despite their efforts, 24 groups survived the application process and were awarded the start-up loans. Up to 40 other groups were in the process of applying when the friends of the industry got language slipped into the fiscal cliff bill to eliminate all future loans. This means that people in more than half the country will not be able to enroll in a nonprofit co-op come Jan. 1.” (My italics)

2.  ”. . . one big drug company-Amgen-was able to get language quietly inserted in the fiscal cliff bill that will cost the Medicare program millions of dollars.”

Are you getting the picture that Minnesota HMOs are beginning to look like Sacred Prairie Cows?

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