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minnesota vote suppression

NoVoteHere’s the cover page of the bill, SF514. I’m just going to pass along the bulk of an email from the Minnesota Senate DFL Caucus, specifically Assistant Minority Leader Sen. Susan Kent (DFL-Woodbury).
 

The Omnibus Elections Bill authored by Republican Mary Kiffmeyer would create a controversial and complicated provisional balloting system that would throw out legitimate ballots so that not all votes would be counted. Furthermore, it would allow anybody to challenge your ballot without basis or cause. If your ballot were to be challenged, your vote may not be counted and your private data would be permanently made public. Not only is this a bad idea, it also adds millions of dollars in costs to already overburdened counties.
 
Countless Minnesotans would be disenfranchised and unnecessarily hassled if this becomes law. Republicans’ goal is to suppress the vote so that they can more easily pass their agenda. When fewer people participate, Republicans win. They want to change the rules to make it harder for your vote to be counted.

Comment below fold.
 
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On vote suppression in Minnesota

by Dan Burns on October 11, 2012 · 0 comments

I’m passing along a couple of things.  This first one is downright uplifting.

Minnesota-based Organizing Apprenticeship Project (OAP) launched its “Voices for Voting Rights” video series, a campaign that uses narratives and storytelling to engage communities of color in opposition to the voter ID amendment. Jointly produced by Line Break Media, the series of five videos target five Minnesota communities: Latino, Somali, African-American, Native American and Hmong.

The videos are part of the OAP’s ongoing training and policy research aimed to reframe the discourse around voter ID.

“What was important to us was to be able to…have each video both come from and speak to each community,” said Vina Kay, OAP Director of Research and Policy. “We want it to belong to the community. We wanted the people to be comfortable in how they were communicating their story.”

I’ve seen items elsewhere to the same effect as the following.  Namely, that conservatives also potentially have plenty to lose by attacking voting rights.

The photo voter ID amendment will decrease overall turnout, but it’s not just DFL voters that will lose the ability to vote.

I oppose the amendment. It’s bad public policy. High voter turnout is good for the civic life of our state and voter disenfranchisement is wrong, regardless of who is losing their ability to vote. But there are a number of Republican leaning voter groups who would be directly affected by an ID requirement.

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As you may have seen, a couple of weeks ago, the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) is purportedly getting away from vote suppression as a primary focus.  Another group promptly indicated that it would take up the cause.

The National Center for Public Policy Research (NCPPR) will be stepping into the breach the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) left this week when it disbanded its voter suppression arm. Because having as many people vote as possible is very dangerous to Republicans, who aren’t so popular, the Right has to make sure that someone is in charge of returning the nation to Jim Crow days, and now the NCPPR is it…

Don’t know much about the NCPPR? PR Watch has the details about this “think tank,” including the assistance the group gave to Jack Abramoff in essentially laundering millions of dollars and the fundraising tactic of “bombarding senior citizens with ‘fright mail.'” They use that money to do things like help Exxon Mobil fight against efforts to address climate change.

A quick search provided nothing specific about NCPPR activity in Minnesota, yet. But I’m sure that it’s just a matter of time.

Here’s a good read about how activists in some states are dealing with vote suppression legislation that is in place.

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