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Trump/GOP assault on workers is here

by Dan Burns on March 24, 2017

childworkAbsolutely despicable. Then again, is there anything about Trump, Lyin’ Ryan, and their minions that isn’t?
 

While the details of President Donald Trump’s proposed 2018 budget remain scant, one thing is clear: The Department of Labor will likely be one of the biggest losers. Trump’s budget proposal would cut the department’s funding by $2.5 billion, or 21 percent, which will mean drastic changes for the work the department does…
 
The 2018 budget details around $500 million in cuts for the department, which likely means that programs for disadvantaged workers, including seniors, youths, and those with disabilities, would be reduced or completely eliminated. The Senior Community Service Employment Program, training grants at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and technical-assistance grants at the Office of Disability Employment Policy would all disappear. Job-training centers for disadvantaged children would be shuttered and funding for more general job-training and employment services would move from the federal budget to states.
(The Atlantic)

The infamous Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) introduced a bill last month which would take Right To Be Exploited national.
 

In the last Congress, when the bill was largely symbolic because it had no chance of being signed into law by Obama, House Republicans were barely able to get more than half their caucus on board. (Compare that to the similarly fruitless efforts to repeal Obamacare, which Republicans repeatedly passed). In the Senate, too, they never got close to having unanimous support within the party. This time around, there appears to be even less early support for the National Right to Work Act.
 
With the plethora of serious reform efforts being mounted by Republicans (healthcare, immigration, environmental, employment and so much more), Democrats would be wise to treat this bill for what is really is: a public relations stunt that has little chance of success, but is more broadly being used to help promote right-to-work efforts in the states…
 
Furthermore, King’s National Right to Work Act can serve to distract attention away from rule changes and executive orders that will affect millions of workers.
(In These Times)

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